A new Saudi foreign policy

Nawaf Obaid writes:

A tectonic shift has occurred in the U.S.-Saudi relationship. Despite significant pressure from the Obama administration to remain on the sidelines, Saudi leaders sent troops into Manama in March to defend Bahrain’s monarchy and quell the unrest that has shaken that country since February. For more than 60 years, Saudi Arabia has been bound by an unwritten bargain: oil for security. Riyadh has often protested but ultimately acquiesced to what it saw as misguided U.S. policies. But American missteps in the region since Sept. 11, an ill-conceived response to the Arab protest movements and an unconscionable refusal to hold Israel accountable for its illegal settlement building have brought this arrangement to an end. As the Saudis recalibrate the partnership, Riyadh intends to pursue a much more assertive foreign policy, at times conflicting with American interests.

The backdrop for this change are the rise of Iranian meddling in the region and the counterproductive policies that the United States has pursued here since Sept. 11. The most significant blunder may have been the invasion of Iraq, which resulted in enormous loss of life and provided Iran an opening to expand its sphere of influence. For years, Iran’s leadership has aimed to foment discord while furthering its geopolitical ambitions. Tehran has long funded Hamas and Hezbollah; recently, its scope of attempted interference has broadened to include the affairs of Arab states from Yemen to Morocco. This month the chief of staff of Iran’s armed forces, Gen. Hasan Firouzabadi, harshly criticized Riyadh over its intervention in Bahrain, claiming this act would spark massive domestic uprisings.

Obaid describes Saudi priorities: stable Arab monarchies (see some background here on the expansion of the Gulf Cooperation Council), “orderly transition” in Yemen and Syria (if necessary), strong opposition to the Iranian-aligned Maliki government in Iraq, restricting Iranian influence in Lebanon and Syria, and a “just settlement” of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict based on the plan proposed by the Saudi king (when he was crown prince) in 2002. The kingdom will also increase its military capabilities to combat Iran and international terrorists. Obaid concludes:

Saudi Arabia has the will and the means to meet its expanded global responsibilities. In some issues, such as counterterrorism and efforts to fight money laundering, the Saudis will continue to be a strong U.S. partner. In areas in which Saudi national security or strategic interests are at stake, the kingdom will pursue its own agenda. With Iran working tirelessly to dominate the region, the Muslim Brotherhood rising in Egypt and unrest on nearly every border, there is simply too much at stake for the kingdom to rely on a security policy written in Washington, which has backfired more often than not and spread instability. The special relationship may never be the same, but from this transformation a more stable and secure Middle East can be born.

Obaid certainly likes to praise the stability and virtue of the Saudi regime. The op-ed excerpted above includes a link to another op-ed which explains the reasons for this stability.

Hat tip: a gleeful Jeff Goldberg, who asks “Does This Mean We Won’t Have to Save Saudi Arabia Anymore?” and gives the improved Saudi military “at least six hours” in a serious contest with the Iranian military.

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